In full-hearted agreement

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The most recent newsletter of the Cove Island Wildlife Sanctuary — a great spot not too far from my house — is not written by Dave Winston as it usually it, but rather a tribute to Dave and the hard work he does for the Sanctuary. Dave, along with many others, was instrumental in creating the Sanctuary in the first place and continues to maintain and nurture the grounds. I agree that a tribute was in order (not that anyone needed my approval), so here’s the link to the newsletter. Good job and thanks Dave.

Here’s the link.

Pink flower in bloom, another meadow close-up

Photo by Chris Bosak Flower in bloom at a meadow property of the Darien Land Trust, summer 2013.

Photo by Chris Bosak
Flower in bloom at a meadow property of the Darien Land Trust, summer 2013.

Here is the latest in a series of close-up (macro) photographs I took last summer while tromping through the meadow properties of the Darien Land Trust. From July 24 to Aug. 31, I’ll post a different close-up meadow photograph on this site.

Here’s more background on the project.

Bee on bee balm, another meadow close-up

Photo by Chris Bosak A bumble bee gets nectar from bee balm at a meadow property of the Darien Land Trust, summer 2013.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A bumble bee gets nectar from bee balm at a meadow property of the Darien Land Trust, summer 2013.

Here is the latest in a series of close-up (macro) photographs I took last summer while tromping through the meadow properties of the Darien Land Trust. From July 24 to Aug. 31, I’ll post a different close-up meadow photograph on this site.

Here’s more background on the project.

Enjoying the garden visitors with my boy; latest For the Birds column

Photo by Chris Bosak An American Goldfinch perches on a sunflower and picks out seeds in a New England garden.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An American Goldfinch perches on a sunflower and picks out seeds in a New England garden.

Here’s a link to the latest For the Birds column in which I write about watching some garden visitors with my 11-year-old son Andrew.

Click here for story.

Dayflower, another meadow close-up

Photo by Chris Bosak Dayflower in bloom at meadow property of Darien Land Trust.

Photo by Chris Bosak
Dayflower in bloom at meadow property of Darien Land Trust.

 

Here is the latest in a series of close-up (macro) photographs I took last summer while tromping through the meadow properties of the Darien Land Trust. From July 24 to Aug. 31, I’ll post a different close-up meadow photograph on this site.

Here’s more background on the project.

Northern Mockingbird sings at night

Photo by Chris Bosak Northern Mockingbird perches before jumping up to a suet feeder in Stamford, Conn.

Photo by Chris Bosak
Northern Mockingbird perches before jumping up to a suet feeder in Stamford, Conn.

Here’s the start of a new birding column I wrote for The Hour and Keene Sentinel. It involves listening to a Northern Mockingbirds singing at night — about 11:30 p.m.

“I walked out of work following one of my night shifts here at The Hour. It was about 11:30 p.m. so the last thing I expected was to have an interesting birdwatching experience in the parking lot. The birding world is full of surprises, though. I stepped out the front door of the office building and was greeted by the sound of a Blue Jay calling. Odd time for a Blue Jay to be singing, I thought. Must be raiding a nest or having its nest raided. The Blue Jay called three times and then another bird starting singing. At that point I knew it wasn’t a Blue Jay and another bird at all. It was a Northern Mockingbird. My frame of mind instantly went from wonder to amusement. I walked over to the area where the bird was singing, pulled out my cell phone and started recording. It kept on belting out the tunes even though I was standing right under its tree. Mockingbirds are master imitators. They imitate the song of a bird species three times and then move on to the next imitation. And it goes on and on. It is believed that the more impressive the repertoire, the better chance the bird has of attracting a mate. I like listening to a mockingbird and trying to figure out the birds it is imitating. I almost always get a Carolina Wren and American Robin. This particular mockingbird the other night had an impressive list of at least 15 species that also included Tufted Titmouse, Red-winged Blackbirds and Broad-winged Hawk. Many mockingbirds also mix in non-bird noises, such as squeaky fences or alarm clocks. The songs are not sung half-h

Here’s the rest of the column

 Here’s the video

See how many bird species you can pick out from this impressive songster.