The new Osprey nest in photos

Photo by Chris Bosak An Osprey adjusts a stick in its nest at Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., April 29, 2015.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An Osprey adjusts a stick in its nest at Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., April 29, 2015.

Photo by Chris Bosak A male Osprey flies into a nest occupied by its mate at Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., April 29, 2015.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A male Osprey flies into a nest occupied by its mate at Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., April 29, 2015.

There’s a new Osprey nest in town. Big deal, you may be thinking, Osprey are everywhere these days. Well, that’s true and, of course, that’s a good thing.

This particular Osprey nest is in Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., a coastal town in southern New England along the Long Island Sound. What makes this Osprey nest special is its accessibility for people to see. Hopefully when the busy season comes for the park, the Osprey will not get flustered by the foot traffic or outright disturbed by someone or a group of people.

My latest For the Birds column in The Hour newspaper is about this nest, so I won’t write one and one about it again. Instead, this post will feature the nest and Osprey pair in photos. But for those interested, here’s the link to the column. (Click here.)

Photo by Chrisi Bosak An Osprey pair copulates at Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., April 29, 2015.

Photo by Chrisi Bosak
An Osprey pair copulates at Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., April 29, 2015.

Photo by Chrisi Bosak A male Osprey flies above a female Osprey at Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., April 29, 2015.

Photo by Chrisi Bosak
A male Osprey flies above a female Osprey at Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., April 29, 2015.

Photo by Chrisi Bosak A male Osprey flies above a female Osprey at Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., April 29, 2015.

Photo by Chrisi Bosak
A male Osprey flies above a female Osprey at Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn., April 29, 2015.

 

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2 thoughts on “The new Osprey nest in photos

  1. I am a veteran of the first Gulf War I’ve just started venturing out again after so many years and I’ve discovered Osprey when I was young it was a Mande Mr. Fernandina’s in WestportDartmouth mass that started building the nest and they are everywhere near my home there were three nest I live on a title river it takes my breath away when I see them (tidal river) still learning to use my phone not easy but I hope whoever I’ve texted gets this message I love seeing the any more information you can provide me such as did they use the same nest every year do the young ones come back to the same nest the following year how many eggs are late how many survive I don’t even know if this will get to somebody

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    • Thanks so much for writing and sorry for the delay in getting back to you. Yes, Osprey are great see and it’s so nice to see them thriving again. They do return to the same nest each year. What is interesting about them is that babies are born in spring and grow quickly and fly south in the fall to South America with the adults birds. The adult birds will return to New England next spring, but the babies will wait three or four years before returning and hopefully having families of their own. They typically lay 2 or 3 eggs and usually 2 survive, unless a predator like a crow, hawk or raccoon gets to the eggs or babies. Thanks again for writing and please write again if you have more questions. Chris

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