Full length shot of the heron; check out those legs

Photo by Chris Bosak A Great Blue Heron rests on a log in a pond in Danbury, Conn., March 2017.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A Great Blue Heron rests on a log in a pond in Danbury, Conn., March 2017.

Well, you can see one leg anyway. The other is tucked into its feathers as a way to regulate blood flow and keep extremities from freezing — a ploy used by many birds. I like the spot of blue by the heron’s eye.

More heron photos to come shortly. Another heron was hanging out nearby, too. More on that one soon.

Great blue heron with breeding plumage in the snow

Photo by Chris Bosak A Great Blue Heron rests on a log in a pond in Danbury, Conn., March 2017.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A Great Blue Heron rests on a log in a pond in Danbury, Conn., March 2017.

Despite the 14 inches of snow that fell in Danbury, Conn., a few days ago, this Great Blue Heron is ready for spring and sporting its breeding plumage. Late winter snow falls can make for some interesting photos for sure.

A lingering Great Blue Heron; to migrate or not to migrate

Photo by Chris Bosak A Great Blue Heron stands on a dock near the Norwalk River on Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A Great Blue Heron stands on a dock near the Norwalk River on Wednesday, Dec. 17, 2014.

Some try to stick out the New England winters and some fly south where it’s warmer. That can be said for several species of birds, but for this posting I’m talking about Great Blue Herons. The pictured bird was found earlier this week near Veterans Park in Norwalk, Conn.

It’s an interesting dilemma¬†for the birds. What gives the better chance of survival? Sticking out a New England winter and subsisting on the small fish to be found, or risking the perils of migration and moving to a warmer climate? Both have their risks, of course. A particularly cold winter can spell doom for the herons that stay around. However, the risks Continue reading