Birds to brighten your day: April 21

Photo by Chris Bosak An American robin visits a yard in Danbury, CT, April 2020. (Merganser Lake)

A Day on Merganser Lake XII

In all my years of feeding birds, I’ve never had American robins visit my feeders. Until a few days ago, that is. They technically haven’t visited my “feeders” yet, but they are regular visitors to my deck railing on which I place dried mealworms for the bluebirds and pine warblers. And robins, apparently.

We’ve all seen a million robins before, but we can’t ever really tire of them, can we? They are a traditional harbinger of spring (even though many spend all winter with us) and a beloved, easy-to-learn bird. So here’s a neat photo of a robin I got yesterday. Hail to the regular birds!

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)

Now that’s a lot of robins!

Photo by Chris Bosak A flock of American Robins searches through the light snow near a cemetery in southern Connecticut, March 2015.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A flock of American Robins searches through the light snow near a cemetery in southern Connecticut, March 2015.

Early every spring, the robins return in force. Yes, of course many robins remain in New England all winter, but early spring marks the return of many robins that bolted for warmer temps down south.

Nowhere is that more apparent to me than a cemetery and adjacent field at town hall in Darien, CT. I drive past here nearly every day and suddenly one day in late March the fields are filled with American Robins. That day was a few days ago and the robins remain. Soon they will disperse and get down to the serious business of nesting and raising families.

That first robin of the year may not be an accurate harbinger of spring because many are with us all winter, but when the fields are full of robins … now that’s a sign of spring.

(The above photo is admittedly not the greatest, but it gives an idea of how many there are. About 50 are shown in this photo, but the field extends widely to the left and right. In all, there were about 400.)