Birds to brighten your day: Part XI (Bonus edition)

Photo by Chris Bosak Gray Catbird at birdbath.
Photo by Chris Bosak Gray Catbird at birdbath in summer.

In keeping with the birdbath theme, but expanding on it a touch, here is my For the Birds column from two weeks ago that I hadn’t posted here yet.

Water is a vital part of bird habitat. This is true for backyard bird habitats as well. I will admit, however, that I sometimes get lackadaisical about keeping my birdbath filled with fresh water. My house and yard are set up in such a manner that I can’t have my feeders and bath in easy view from my back windows. The bath, therefore, got relegated to the side yard and I don’t often look out those windows.

Often, it’s a case of “out of sight, out of mind,” and the bath goes dry. Then the bluebirds came around and made me pay more attention. I know what you’re thinking: Oh boy, there he goes with his bluebirds again. I don’t have a good comeback for that other than to say: Yes, here I go with my bluebirds again. But I promise it’s not all about bluebirds this time. I walked outside the other day to throw some mealworms on the deck railing Continue reading

Birds to brighten your day: Part IX

Photo by Chris Bosak An eastern bluebird gets a drink from a birdbath in New England, March 2020.

Last week brought frozen temperatures back to southern New England. The birdbath was mostly frozen but a few industrious birds found the right spots to get a drink. Here’s a male eastern bluebird.

(Repeat text from yesterday) With many of us working from home or otherwise “physical distancing” as we combat COVID-19, I will post series of photos that are at least vaguely related to our dealing with the crisis. I’ve already done commingling species as a nod to social distancing. This week’s theme is birdbaths to highlight the need for hand washing. (Even though most birds in this series will be drinking and not bathing.)

Birds to brighten your day: Part IV

Photo by Chris Bosak A Tufted Titmouse and White-breasted Nuthatch share a feeder during a snowstorm in Danbury, Conn., Jan. 23, 2016.
Photo by Chris Bosak
A Tufted Titmouse and White-breasted Nuthatch share a feeder during a snowstorm in Danbury, Conn., Jan. 23, 2016.

Bird feeders often bring together birds that would otherwise rarely be seen commingling. In this case, however, nuthatches and tufted titmice, as well as chickadees, are often seen together “in the wild” as they help each other forage for food. This is one of my favorite shots showing two or more bird species together. I guess I like the symmetry.

(Repeat text from yesterday:) With many of us working from home or otherwise “physical distancing” as we combat COVID-19, I figured I’d start a daily series of photos showing different bird species together. Why not? Maybe it will brighten somebody’s day to see commingling bird species each morning as we’re all stuck inside.

Bluebirds take a drink

Photo by Chris Bosak An eastern bluebird gets a drink from a birdbath in New England, February 2020.

There will be more on this coming next week when the next For the Birds column is posted here, but here’s a teaser photo to get you through a weekend of isolation. Moral of the story in short: offer water to the birds too.

Chickadees and sumac, Part II

Photo by Chris Bosak A black-capped chickadee eats staghorn sumac berries in Hoosick Falls, N.Y., February 2020.

A few weeks ago, I wrote about coming across a sumac patch being invaded by black-capped chickadees. I included only one photo with that post, which is not like me at all. So, here are some more photos from that day.

Photo by Chris Bosak A black-capped chickadee eats staghorn sumac berries in Hoosick Falls, N.Y., February 2020.
Photo by Chris Bosak A black-capped chickadee eats staghorn sumac berries in Hoosick Falls, N.Y., February 2020.

For the Birds: Bluebirds of my own

Here is the latest For the Birds column, which runs weekly in several New England newspaper.

Photo by Chris Bosak An eastern bluebird perches on a pole in New England, February 2020.

Sorry, but I have to go back to writing about bluebirds. After several weeks of writing about bluebirds that other people had in their yards, I finally got some of my own.

I would imagine no apology is necessary, however, as who doesn’t like to hear, read and talk about bluebirds?

I walked into my sunroom and saw through the window just a flash of a bird out of the corner of my eye. The bird had been perched on one of the arms of the feeder pole system and disappeared into woods behind my house.

That was a bluebird, I know it, I told myself, even though I got only the shortest of looks in my peripheral Continue reading

Busy day at the feeder (in photos)

Photo by Chris Bosak A tufted titmouse looks into a cup for peanuts in New England, February 2020.

For a cold February day, it’s been a pretty good day at the feeder. In all, 14 species showed up already and it’s not even noon. The pileated woodpecker was in the side yard, not at the feeders. I took the photo through a dirty, hence the poor quality. Here’s some photographic evidence of the busy day: Continue reading