Birds to brighten your day: May 16

Photo by Chris Bosak A Baltimore oriole perches on a wire in New England, May 2020. Merganser Lake.

A Day on Merganser Lake

I’m getting a lot of reports about Baltimore orioles this spring. It’s great that so many people are seeing them and getting them to their feeders. I’m hearing that some orioles are going to orange halves, some to nectar feeders and some to suet. I also know that orioles like grape jelly. “My” oriole goes to the suet cake and ignores the oranges, grape jelly and nectar feeder right next to it. His visits are also very short and infrequent. Striking bird, for sure.

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)

Birds to brighten your day: May 11

Photo by Chris Bosak
A rose-breasted grosbeak perches on a feeder in New England, May 2020. Merganser Lake.

A Day in Merganser Lake XX

This isn’t the first and hopefully won’t be the last rose-breasted grosbeak in this series. I’m pretty sure they nested in the woods behind my property two years ago. I’m hoping they repeat that this year. Daily visits by rose-breasted grosbeaks would certainly brighten up these odd times.

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)

Birds to brighten your day: May 6

Photo by Chris Bosak A gray catbird perches on a deck railing in New England, April 2020. Merganser Lake.

A Day on Merganser Lake XVI

Catbirds aren’t known as big feeder birds, but this one stopped by briefly for a mealworm or two. I haven’t seen it since. This photo shows the rusty patch under its tail, which is not always shown. During the dog days of summer, sometimes it seems that a few catbirds are the only birdlife to be found. Welcome back to New England!

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)

Photo by Chris Bosak
A gray catbird perches on a deck railing in New England, April 2020. Merganser Lake.

Birds to brighten your day: April 29

Photo by Chris Bosak A male northern cardinal feeds its mate in a backyard in New England, April 2020. Merganser Lake.

A Day on Merganser Lake XX

I like this shot because it reminds me of shy teenagers kissing behind the bushes. I remember those days, even though they were many moons ago. Last week, you may recall, I posted a photo of bluebirds feeding each other. Now, it’s the cardinals’ turn. My latest For the Birds column looks at this behavior. I’ll post the column on this site on Sunday, as usual.

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)

Birds to brighten your day: April 24

Photo by Chris Bosak
A black-capped chickadee checks out a birdhouse in a backyard in New England, April 2020. Merganser Lake.

A Day on Merganser Lake XV

Well, it doesn’t look like the bluebirds are going to nest in the bluebird box I got a few weeks ago. My property is not ideal habitat for them as it’s more wooded than open. At least they are still visiting every day and keeping me entertained. The good news is that black-capped chickadees keep checking it out. Hopefully a pair will decide to move in. They are not bluebirds but I’d certainly take it.

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)

Photo by Chris Bosak
A black-capped chickadee checks out a birdhouse in a backyard in New England, April 2020. Merganser Lake.

Birds to brighten your day: April 21

Photo by Chris Bosak An American robin visits a yard in Danbury, CT, April 2020. (Merganser Lake)

A Day on Merganser Lake XII

In all my years of feeding birds, I’ve never had American robins visit my feeders. Until a few days ago, that is. They technically haven’t visited my “feeders” yet, but they are regular visitors to my deck railing on which I place dried mealworms for the bluebirds and pine warblers. And robins, apparently.

We’ve all seen a million robins before, but we can’t ever really tire of them, can we? They are a traditional harbinger of spring (even though many spend all winter with us) and a beloved, easy-to-learn bird. So here’s a neat photo of a robin I got yesterday. Hail to the regular birds!

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)

Birds to brighten your day: April 16

Photo by Chris Bosak A male northern cardinal visits a backyard in New England, April 2020.

A Day on Merganser Lake VIII

I was all set to run a photo of another bird when I came across this one in the photo folder from yesterday. The other bird would have been just fine and it’s a bird I don’t feature too often, but how can I resist publishing this shot of a male cardinal? Besides, I’ve learned that you can’t go wrong posting photos of hummingbirds, bluebirds or cardinals. So here he is.

It looks like his bill, or beak, is a little beaten up. I’ll have to check my sources on why that is and if the bill will return to normal. My guess is the bird will be just fine regardless of whether his bill returns to normal or not.

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)