Bluebirds in a New England winter — not that uncommon

Photo by Chris Bosak An Eastern Bluebird perches near a lake in Danbury, Conn., Feb. 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An Eastern Bluebird perches near a lake in Danbury, Conn., Feb. 2016.

Eastern Bluebirds, similar to American Robins, are thought of as mostly a spring and summer bird in New England. I love finding an active bluebird box in April or May and watching the parents go back and forth feeding the youngsters hidden inside the box.

But Eastern Bluebirds are also commonly found in New England during the winter. I love seeing them after a snowfall; how their bright blue and orange seem even brighter against the white backdrop. Bluebirds, in fact, may be seen by even more people in the winter than during the spring or summer. For the most part the only people who see bluebirds in the spring and summer are people who see them at their nest box sites. Obviously, that’s because bluebirds are busy fledging youngsters. So, unless you have bluebird boxes in your yard or neighborhood, or if you actively seek them out, you likely won’t see them.

In the winter, however, they can pretty much be anywhere as they are out searching for food. (See this related post.) I’ve seen Eastern Bluebirds at least half a dozen times this winter and it’s always been a random sighting. The habitats have been varied, but typically they favor woodland edges. That gives them the shelter of the woods and the food-seeking opportunities of the adjacent fields or shurblands.

I may have seen plenty of bluebirds this winter, but none of the sightings have presented a very good photo opportunity. Here’s the best I came up with — so far.

Photo by Chris Bosak An Eastern Bluebird takes off from a perch near a mostly frozen lake in Danbury, Conn., Feb. 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An Eastern Bluebird takes off from a perch near a mostly frozen lake in Danbury, Conn., Feb. 2016.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s