Eastern bluebird: Coming in for a landing

Photo by Chris Bosak An eastern bluebird comes in for a landing on a branch in Danbury, CT, May 2020. Merganser Lake.

A Day on Merganser Lake

I posted more than my share of eastern bluebird photos in April and May, but somehow this one slipped through the cracks. Here’s a shot of one coming in for a landing on a birch branch.

Photo by Chris Bosak An eastern bluebird comes in for a landing on a branch in Danbury, CT, May 2020. Merganser Lake.

Apparently, there are more bluebird youngsters

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern bluebird family visits a feeder in Danbury, CT, May 2020. Merganser Lake.

A Day on Merganser Lake

With two teenage boys I can relate to the photo above. I originally thought the bluebird pair that has been coming around since February had only one youngster. Then, all these birds showed up a few hours later. Click here for yesterday’s post, which provides more context.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern bluebird family visits a feeder in Danbury, CT, May 2020. Merganser Lake.
Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern bluebird family visits a feeder in Danbury, CT, May 2020. Merganser Lake.

Bluebird youngster

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern bluebird family visits a feeder in Danbury, CT, May 2020. Merganser Lake.

A Day on Merganser Lake

I have been seeing an eastern bluebird pair at my feeders daily since February. I’m in a fairly wooded area and there are no open fields (bluebird’s preferred nesting area) in the neighborhood. I assumed it was a young pair that wasn’t breeding this year as it was well into the nesting season and they were still visiting daily.

To my pleasant surprise, yesterday the pair showed up with a youngster. It is a noisy and demanding little bluebird. The parents are dutiful in feeding it. I still don’t know exactly where they nested but I’m happy to still see them every day, especially with a youngster in tow. I’ve also seen them in the woods behind my house catching natural prey so, thankfully, they are not relying solely on my mealworm handouts. It’s also nice to see that it is indeed a bluebird youngster and not a cowbird as I’ve seen plenty of those around this spring.

Here are a few more shots of the family.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern bluebird family visits a feeder in Danbury, CT, May 2020. Merganser Lake.
Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern bluebird family visits a feeder in Danbury, CT, May 2020. Merganser Lake.
Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern bluebird family visits a feeder in Danbury, CT, May 2020. Merganser Lake.

Birds to brighten your day: May 8

Photo by Chris Bosak An eastern bluebird perches on a branch in New England, May, 2020. Merganser Lake.

A Day on Merganser Lake XVII

Yes, my bluebirds at still hanging around. I still have two males and one female coming around daily. I got this shot toward the end of the day.

Could I really be posting a snow photo this weekend? I hope the weather people are wrong, but it’s possible.

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)

Birds to brighten your day: April 22

Photo by Chris Bosak
A male eastern bluebird feeds his mate mealworms in a backyard in Danbury, Connecticut, April 2020. Merganser Lake.

A Day on Merganser Lake XIII

I caught these love birds (eastern bluebirds really) in an intimate moment yesterday as the male fed his mate some dried mealworms. How romantic, I know. I have been seeing them do this over the last few days but have never been quick enough with the camera. This time I was ready and got their special moment.

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)

Birds to brighten your day: April 13

Photo by Chris Bosak
Male and female eastern bluebird in Danbury, CT, 06810, April 2020, Merganser Lake.

A Day on Merganser Lake V

I know I’ve been posting a lot of bluebirds lately, but I couldn’t resist this one of a male and female together. The bluebirds have been coming for my mealworms for over a month now. It’s been great, but any day now they will leave for suitable habitat for raise a family. Hopefully they will be back next winter.

Today will be a challenge to get a good shot for tomorrow. It’s windy, dark and rainy. Maybe the weather will break later.

(Repeat text for context:  I’m running out of COVID-19 lockdown themes so from now until things get back to some semblance of normalcy, I will simply post my best photo from the previous day. You could say it fits because of its uncertainty and challenge. I’ll call the series “A Day on Merganser Lake,” even though that’s not the real name of the lake I live near in southwestern Connecticut, it’s just a nod to my favorite duck family.)

Birds to brighten your day: Bluebird days III

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern bluebird visits a backyard feeder for mealworms in New England, Feb. 2020.

Here’s one of the females perched on a stick in my container garden. I think that stick helped to support a “volunteer” sunflower that grew from a seed that the birds (and squirrels, chipmunks, raccoons and whatever else shows up at night) somehow missed. Have a great weekend everybody!

Birds to brighten your day: Bluebird Days I

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern bluebird perches on a branch in New England, February 2020.

You had to have known it was coming. I’ve been praising bluebirds all winter, even before “mine” started to visit about a month ago, so why not make them the next subject of my bird photo series? Did I mention I’ve had bluebirds in my backyard for the last month? I did? Oh, so you can imagine how many photos I have of them by now. Over the next several days, I’ll post one to help you get through this not-so-happy time in our history.

Bluebirds in a New England winter — not that uncommon

Photo by Chris Bosak An Eastern Bluebird perches near a lake in Danbury, Conn., Feb. 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An Eastern Bluebird perches near a lake in Danbury, Conn., Feb. 2016.

Eastern Bluebirds, similar to American Robins, are thought of as mostly a spring and summer bird in New England. I love finding an active bluebird box in April or May and watching the parents go back and forth feeding the youngsters hidden inside the box.

But Eastern Bluebirds are also commonly found in New England during the winter. I love seeing them after a snowfall; how their bright blue and orange seem even brighter against the white backdrop. Bluebird Continue reading