Just a typical day in the backyard

Photo by Chris Bosak
A white-breasted nuthatch perches on a pole as a downy woodpecker eats suet from a feeder, New England 2019.

The word typical can have a negative connotation. It is usually used to describe something boring or mundane. Or worse, as a word of exasperation to draw attention to a recurring negative behavior: “Oh, that’s so typical of him.”

But I’m going to use typical in a positive way here. Yesterday, all the typical birds showed up at my feeder. And that’s a good thing. My ‘typicals’ include chickadees, titmice, white-breasted nuthatches, downy woodpeckers, red-bellied woodpeckers, and blue jays. You can throw juncos in there, too, in the winter. Other birds come from time to time, but those are the birds that are always there. Many people write to me about a lack of chickadees at their feeders lately. It’s definitely a trend to keep an eye on, but thankfully, I still have plenty of chickadees visiting my feeders.

Not that I’m boasting about my feeders. There are some obvious bird species that I hardly ever see. Cardinals, for whatever reason, are rare sightings at my feeders. Although I get plenty of juncos in the winter, I rarely see white-throated sparrows.

Yesterday I decided to celebrate my typicals and get some updated photos of them for my files. Here are a few of them …

Photo by Chris Bosak A blue jay grabs a peanut from a deck railing in New England, fall 2019.
Photo by Chris Bosak A black-capped chickadee waits its turn at a feeding station in New England, fall 2019.
Photo by Chris Bosak A red-bellied woodpecker inspects a peanut on a deck railing, New England, fall 2019.
Photo by Chris Bosak A white-breasted nuthatch visits a suet feeder in New England, fall 2019.
Photo by Chris Bosak A tufted titmouse grabs a peanut in New England, fall 2019.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s