A flurry of winter bird photos before spring begins

Photo by Chris Bosak A red-bellied woodpecker grabs a peanut from a feeder, March 2018.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A red-bellied woodpecker grabs a peanut from a feeder, March 2018.

Andrew, my 14-year-old going on 21, and I took a walk in the woods together this evening. These walks don’t happen as often as they used to or as much as I’d like, so I was more than happy when he said ‘yes,’ when I asked if he’d like to come along.

The trail behind my house is covered in snow, but it’s been walked on and packed down so it’s not much different than walking on dirt or on a sidewalk. But, as my walks with Andrew almost always go, we veered off the path to check out one thing or another. As we ventured away from the path, the snow at spots was still a foot or more deep. A foot or deeper on March 19, two days away from the official start of spring. Welcome to New England.

The snow won’t last forever. It never does. So, before the snow gives way to rain and eventually days so sunny and hot we’ll be¬†complaining about the heat and humidity, here are some photos from this past winter (see how I used it past tense already?) that I never got around to posting …

Photo by Chris Bosak A cardinal grabs a seed from a feeder, March 2018.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A cardinal grabs a seed from a feeder, March 2018.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A blue jay grabs a seed from a feeder, March 2018.

Photo by Chris Bosak A gold finch waits patiently by a feeder, March 2018.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A gold finch waits patiently by a feeder, March 2018.

 Photo by Chris Bosak A blue jay grabs a seed from a feeder, March 2018.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A blue jay grabs a seed from a feeder, March 2018.

Photo by Chris Bosak A red-bellied woodpecker visits a feeder, March 2018.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A red-bellied woodpecker visits a feeder, March 2018.

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2 thoughts on “A flurry of winter bird photos before spring begins

    • Thanks for writing Ezzell! Red-capped would be a good name for them as the red on the belly is not seen often. Red-headed, of course, is already taken by another woodpecker. Thanks again for writing.

      Like

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