A random bobolink photo — why not?

Photo by Chris Bosak A bobolink perches on a branch in Brookfield, CT, May 2019.

I got this shot a few weeks ago of one of my favorite New England summer birds, the bobolink. They are black, white and yellow (like the Steelers) and have a crazy song that sounds like R2D2. What’s not to like?

One thing not to like is that bobolinks are in decline throughout their range because of habitat destruction. Bobolinks nest in fields of tall grass and that habitat is disappearing fast as developers eye it for condos or shopping centers, or towns see the potential for more soccer fields instead of critical wildlife habitat. Bobolinks aren’t alone as many field species are in similar peril. All one has to do is walk through a field or meadow in the summer to appreciate how valuable that habitat is to wildlife.

More brant photos

Photo by Chris Bosak A brant seen at Calf Pasture Beach in Norwalk, Conn., April 2019.

You didn’t think I’d see thousands of brant and limit the experience to just one post, did you? Here is the first follow-up to Saturday’s post. The original post is here in case you missed it.

Photo by Chris Bosak
Brant at Calf Pasture Beach in Norwalk, Connecticut, 2019.

This brant is banded with silver bands on each leg. I can’t make out the numbers and letters, however.

Photo by Chris Bosak
Brant at Calf Pasture Beach in Norwalk, Connecticut, 2019.

Birds in snow: Red-bellied woodpecker and mourning dove

Photo by Chris Bosak
A red-bellied woodpecker and mourning dove share a platform feeder in March 2019 in Danbury, Connecticut.

As promised, another snowy bird photo taken during this three-day stretch of overnight snow. “There will be more, lots more.” (An obscure line from my favorite movie, The Jerk.)

More snow means more snowy bird photos

Photo by Chris Bosak
A pine siskin perches on the top of an evergreen in Danbury, CT, March 2019.

For the third consecutive day, southern New England was hit by an overnight snowfall. None of the “storms” amounted to much in terms of accumulation but they did create some good bird photography opportunities.

Here are a few to get started. Many more to come …

Photo by Chris Bosak A pine siskin perches on the top of an evergreen in Danbury, CT, March 2019.

Chickadee on Ice: Winter storm hits southern New England

Photo by Chris Bosak A black-capped chickadee rests on an icy branch during a winter storm in Jan. 2019 in New England.

The weather forecasters got this one right: a little snow followed by ice. In southern Connecticut, we went to bed with snow falling and woke up to everything covered in a sheath of ice. Photo opps abound! Send your best shots to birdsofnewengland@gmail.com and I’ll share them on this site.

Photo by Chris Bosak Winter ice storm in New England, Jan. 2019.

More ice shots I

Photo by Chris Bosak
Ice on Little Merganser Lake in Danbury, Conn., winter 2019.

With a winter storm expected to hit New England this evening, here is another ice shot from my walk on the frozen pond the other day. I’ll post one more later tonight. Be safe and enjoy the snow tonight!

Appreciating ice: Walking on a frozen pond

Photo by Chris Bosak Ice on Little Merganser Lake in Danbury, Conn., winter 2019.

The walk yielded no birds except for a raven making strange noises overhead. No matter, the ice kept me busy.

The following photos were taken at the beaver pond (what I like to refer as Little Merganser Lake) at Lake Waubeeka in Danbury, Connecticut. We’ve had cold Continue reading

Lingering garden scene

Scenes like this are quickly fading as winter starts to creep into New England. These coneflowers have lingered into late fall because I purchased them at a box hardware store on clearance a few weeks ago. I’m hoping the flowers return next year, but until then I’m enjoying their later-than-usual blooms. The birds are, too, of course.

A flurry of winter bird photos before spring begins

Photo by Chris Bosak A red-bellied woodpecker grabs a peanut from a feeder, March 2018.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A red-bellied woodpecker grabs a peanut from a feeder, March 2018.

Andrew, my 14-year-old going on 21, and I took a walk in the woods together this evening. These walks don’t happen as often as they used to or as much as I’d like, so I was more than happy when he said ‘yes,’ when I asked if he’d like to come along.

The trail behind my house is covered in snow, but it’s been walked on and packed down so it’s not much different than walking on dirt or on a sidewalk. But, as my walks with Andrew almost always go, we veered off the path to check out one thing or another. As we ventured away from the path, the snow at spots was still a foot or more deep. A foot or deeper on March 19, two days away from the official start of Continue reading