Volunteers for osprey monitoring sought in Connecticut

Photo by Chris Bosak An Osprey soars over the Norwalk River this summer.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An Osprey soars over the Norwalk River this summer.

The Osprey population in Connecticut, especially along the coast, is booming. That’s a good thing, of course, as Osprey are considered a keystone species, meaning they are at the top of the food chain and rely on the health of an environment at all levels. It speaks well for Long Island Sound.

Connecticut Audubon Society is calling on volunteers to help monitor this burgeoning population. Click below to learn more about the project and how you may be able to help.

Click here for more information.

Osprey flying with fish in talons

Photo by Chris Bosak An Osprey flies with a fish at Milford Point in Milford, CT, June 2014.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An Osprey flies with a fish at Milford Point in Milford, CT, June 2014.

I saw the shadow in the sand and knew it was something big. I wheeled around and saw the Osprey flying with the fish and scrambled to try to get the bird in the view finder of my camera. I didn’t nail the photo by any stretch of the imagination, but the scene was pretty neat so I figured I’d share the subpar photo anyway.

This Osprey was photographed at Milford Point in Milford, CT, on Monday, June 16. It was flying the large fish back to its nest not far from the beach. The fish was plucked from Long Island Sound.

Osprey catch their fish and in midair adjust the catch in their talons to make it more aerodynamic.

BirdsofNewEngland’s random bird thought of the day: Osprey coming back

Photo by Chris Bosak Osprey eats a fish at Norwalk's Calf Pasture Beach, March 26, 2013.

Photo by Chris Bosak
Osprey eats a fish at Norwalk’s Calf Pasture Beach, March 26, 2013.

Here’s another random bird thought for you.

Ospreys that are born in New England fly to their wintering grounds in South America and do not return the next summer. They come back the second summer when they are of breeding age.

New England’s Osprey population has increased tremendously — especially in coastal areas — over the last decade. Good news!

Some Osprey have returned to New England already, but most will return in late March or early April.

Have a question for my “random thoughts?” Send it to bozclark@earthlink.net