And the answer is …

Female bobolink

Many of you got this one right. I knew you could do it!!

Yes, it is a female bobolink. I had posted a photo of the male a few days ago, so I figured a lot of you would be on to me for this quiz.

Thanks again for supporting http://www.BirdsofNewEngland.com

As a refresher, here’s the male again.

Photo by Chris Bosak A male bobolink perches in a small tree and overlooks the fields at Happy Landings in Brookfield, CT.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A male bobolink perches in a small tree and overlooks the fields at Happy Landings in Brookfield, CT.

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Another birding quiz — this one much easier

Name the bird

Here’s another birding quiz for you. This time I’ll take it easy on you considering the difficulty of the last one. So … what bird is this? For a clue, check out my last several posts on this site.

Thanks for playing along and supporting http://www.BirdsofNewEngland.com

And the answer is …

Photo by Chris Bosak

I said it was a tough one, but I couldn’t stump http://www.BirdsofNewEngland.com followers as there were a few correct answers.

The bird in question is an immature Gray Jay. I watched as the parents foraged and this noisy youngster kept asking for more food. Sounds like some human teenagers I know.

New birding quiz … this is a tough one

Photo by Chris Bosak

My birding quizzes are sometimes easy, sometimes hard and sometimes in the middle. I would rank this one as a tough one. If I weren’t at the scene I doubt I would have come up with the answer. Oh well, there’s no cost to play, no prizes for winners and no penalty for wrong guesses.

Email, tweet, Facebook or comment here with your guess. Thanks for playing along.

Quick hint: Yes, it is a bird found in New England. Also, to be fair since there is no real size perspective, it is about the size of a robin. I’ll drop more hints today and tomorrow.

Birding quiz answer; yes, the majority got it right

quiz

I should know better than to try to fool my viewers. Once again you passed the birding quiz with flying colors as 56 percent of you got the right answer. It is a female Rose-breasted Grosbeak. It it colored nothing like the flashy male, but the overall shape and bill size and shape are similar to the male.

Good job everyone! Til next time …

Easy birding quiz for your winter weekend

quiz

Here’s an easy birding quiz to warm up this cold New England weekend. (I shouldn’t say it’s easy. I wouldn’t have known it when I first starting birding.)

Two hints:

  1. It’s not a seasonal appropriate photo. (They aren’t around these parts in the winter.)
  2. Remember many birds are sexually dimorphic.

So what it is it?

And the answer is …

A female Common Yellowthroat seen at Terrywile Park in Danbury, Conn, Sept. 2016.

A female Common Yellowthroat seen at Terrywile Park in Danbury, Conn, Sept. 2016.

Pat yourselves on the back because the selection with the most votes was the bird in question. The photo is of a Common Yellowthroat. The trick was that it is a female bird seen in the fall. When most people think of Common Yellowthroats they think of the male with its handsome masked face. Like many bird species, the female Common Yellowthroat is more drably plumaged than the male. Good job everyone!

Birding Quiz … name the bird

nh100616sptbirds

Quick and easy (sort of) birding quiz for you. Fall can be confusing with all the non-breeding plumaged males, first-year birds and the like. So, what are we looking at here?

And the answer is …

 

Photo by Chris Bosak An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

A newt. More accurately an eft, which is a terrestrial stage of a newt’s life. The efts eventually make their way to water and become newts, which are duller in color and have a tail more suitable for aquatic life.

Birders, hikers and anyone else who uses wooded trails must be careful in the spring and summer, especially after a rain, to be sure not to step on these interesting creatures.

Click here forĀ a Wikipedia page with more information.

Here are few more photos.

Photo by Chris Bosak An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

New birding quiz

Photo by Chris Bosak

Photo by Chris Bosak

It’s been a while since I’ve posted a birding quiz. So here’s another … what is this?

Big hint … it is NOT a bird or a part of bird!!! It is something that birders often come across when out in the woods, however. (That’s another hint.)

Answer coming soon at http://www.BirdsofNewEngland.com

Answer by leaving a comment, emailingĀ me at bozclark@earthlink.net, or just make the guess in your head and wait for the answer.

Thanks for playing along.