And the answer is … (Well, most of you knew it anyway)

Photo by Chris Bosak Two Brown Creepers cling to the bottom of an oak tree in Danbury, Conn., Feb. 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak
Two Brown Creepers cling to the bottom of an oak tree in Danbury, Conn., Feb. 2016.

Here’s the photo again with arrows pointing to the birds. Most of you were able to pick out the two birds and, yes, as many of you also suggested, it is two Brown Creepers. It’s a fairly unusual sight to see one Brown Creeper, but two on the same tree is very unusual. I guess it helps that there was a suet feeder above dropping crumbs onto the base of the tree. It also helped that it was about 0 degrees that day and birds were on the lookout for whatever food they could find.

This wasn’t a particularly challenging quiz as the birds stuck out more than usual as their white bellies were exposed. Below is another photo of a Brown Creeper, showing just how well these brown birds blend in with their surroundings. Good camo, for sure.

Thanks again for playing along.

Photo by Chris Bosak A Brown Creeper clings to an oak tree in Danbury, Conn., Feb. 2016

Photo by Chris Bosak
A Brown Creeper clings to an oak tree in Danbury, Conn., Feb. 2016

 

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More Brown Creeper photos from #GBBC

Photo by Chris Bosak A Brown Creeper finds food at the base of a tree during a cold snap in February 2016, Danbury, Connecticut.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A Brown Creeper finds food at the base of a tree during a cold snap in February 2016, Danbury, Connecticut.

Here are some more shots of the Brown Creeper that visited my yard during the cold snap experienced in New England over the weekend. With temperatures at or even below zero for much of the weekend, it wasn’t easy snapping photos of birds in the yard, but the thrill of seeing these energetic, albeit rather nondescript, birds made me forget about the cold for the time being.

Brown Creepers may not be much to look at with their small size and white and brown coloring, they are a thrill to see nonetheless. They are rather common in New England, but it’s not a bird you see every day, or in great n Continue reading

Brown Creeper and Yellow-bellied Sapsucker pay a visit

Photo by Chris Bosak Brown Creeper at base of tree.

Photo by Chris Bosak
Brown Creeper at base of tree.

At one point today a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker was on the suet feeder and a Brown Creeper crept along the base of an adjacent tree. Neither are earth-shattering sightings, but both are rather unusual in my part of New England at Merganser Lake. In fact, it was the first time I had ever seen a sapsucker at one of my feeders. I even managed to get a decent photograph of the Brown Creeper, a species that can be tricky to shoot.

The photos accompanying this post, admittedly, don’t look that great. They are merely photos I took with my iPhone of the display screen of my camera. When I have more time I’ll get to a computer and download the photos, but for now the mediocre iPhone will have to do. Thanks for your patience. I wanted to post this as soon as possible as this is Great Backyard Bird Count weekend. It runs through Monday, so maybe this posting will inspire others to participate. For more information, click here.

Photo by Chris Bosak Yellow-bellied Sapsucker on suet feeder.

Photo by Chris Bosak
Yellow-bellied Sapsucker on suet feeder.

Latest For the Birds column — Far parking pays off again

Photo by Chris Bosak A Brown Creeper climbs up the underside of a branch on a tree in Norwalk, Dec. 2014.

Photo by Chris Bosak
A Brown Creeper climbs up the underside of a branch on a tree in Norwalk, Dec. 2014.

Here’s my latest For the Birds column that appeared in The Hour and Keene Sentinel. A few months ago I wrote about the advantages of parking in a spot far away from my work’s building, so I could walk along the river to see what birds were around. Well, the practice paid off again.

Read about it here.

First post for the new BirdsofNewEngland.com

Green Heron in southern Connecticut, November 2013.

Green Heron in southern Connecticut, November 2013.

Welcome to the new http://www.birdsofnewengland.com. It will be similar to the former website with lots of bird photos and stories from my travels around New England. It will have a different look, however, and new features, such as a video page and “reader submitted” photos page. Feel free to submit photos you have taken of birds or other wildlife in New England (or beyond.)

So let’s just jump right into the first post.

November has been a great month for birdwatching so far, at least from my perspective in southern New England. On the first Sunday in November, I spotted a Green Heron at Selleck’s/Dunlap Woods, a Darien Land Trust property. I’ve seen plenty of Green Herons at this property before, but never in November _ or even October or late September for that matter. It was interesting to see the crow-sized wader surrounded by fall foliage.

Green Heron in Southern Connecticut, November 2013.

Green Heron in Southern Connecticut, November 2013.

The Green Heron sighting followed an hour-long stretch whereby I sat in a dried-out swampy area and watched as Golden-crowned Kinglets, Ruby-crowned Kinglets and Yellow-rumped Warblers hopped along the ground among the weeds and grasses looking for seeds. Previous highlights that weekend included an Eastern Towhee, Brown Creeper and Winter Wrens.

Thanks for checking out the new http://www.BirdsofNewEngland.com. Check back often for updates and new stories and photos. Remember to send in your photos and I’ll add them to the “reader submitted” page. Send the photos or other suggestions to bozclark@earthlink.net