Starting with towhees: Cleaning off the desktop to get ready for fall

Photo by Chris Bosak An eastern towhee perches in thick brush in Ridgefield, Conn., spring 2017.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern towhee perches in thick brush in Ridgefield, Conn., spring 2017.

The spring and summer went by so quickly I didn’t have time to post many of the photos I was able to capture. Typically I posted a few shots of an outing in a post, but filed the dozens of other photos in a “get to them later” folder.

Well, with fall migration starting already, I figured this would be a good time to get around to them. So, without much fanfare or description, these next few posts will be random shots I collected this past spring and summer.

This post features the eastern towhees I found during an early May walk at Bennett’s Pond State Park in Ridgefield, Conn.

Photo by Chris Bosak An eastern towhee perches in thick brush in Ridgefield, Conn., spring 2017.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern towhee perches in thick brush in Ridgefield, Conn., spring 2017.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eastern towhee perches in thick brush in Ridgefield, Conn., spring 2017.

 

Advertisements

Lots of towhees on a rainy day

Photo by Chris Bosak An Eastern Towhee perches on a branch in Ridgefield, Conn., April 2017.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An Eastern Towhee perches on a branch in Ridgefield, Conn., April 2017.

I spent some of the rainy Saturday at Bennett’s Pond in Ridgefield, Conn. I didn’t see or hear a single warbler, but I did see and hear several eastern towhees. It is a great bird with interesting plumage and a unique song.

Formerly called the rufous-sided towhee, this bird has light brown/reddish flanks. Its call is a loud and quickly uttered “tow-hee” and its song is the famous “drink-your-teaaa!” They are more often seen on the ground, scratching in the leaves to uncover food. The male is pictured in this post. The female, which I couldn’t photograph yesterday but did see, is also a handsome bird with white and reddish light brown plumage.

They were passing through in large numbers Saturday. I hope at least a few of them stick around locally to nest. It’s a great bird to see in summer when the birding can get a little slow.

You can even see the little rain drops on this guy.

Here’s one of him singing: Drink-your-teaaa!

Photo by Chris Bosak An Eastern Towhee sings from a perch in Ridgefield, Conn., April 2017.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An Eastern Towhee sings from a perch in Ridgefield, Conn., April 2017.

 

What will this late-fall/early-winter bring?

Photo by Chris Bosak An Eastern Towhee calls from his perch at Selleck's Woods in Darien, Conn., April 2014.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An Eastern Towhee calls from his perch at Selleck’s Woods in Darien, Conn., April 2014.

For years I’ve struggled to get decent shots of Eastern Towhees. Either I couldn’t find them or they remained in thick brush, rendering them unphotographable (but safe from predators, which I guess is way more important than me getting a photograph of one.)

But last fall and early winter, I saw plenty of towhees. The best part is they occasionally came out into the open to be photographed. It was one of the highlights of last fall/early winter. Then, remember, the Snowy Owls came in force into New England.

What will this year bring? I guess we have to wait and see. If you see something interesting out there or you’ve taken a neat photo of a bird (or other wildlife), drop me a line at bozclark@earthlink.net. I’d love to put more photos on my “Reader Submitted Photos” page.