Watch where you step

Photo by Chris Bosak An eft works its way across a path in New England, fall 2021.

If you’ve spent any time in the New England woods in the spring, summer or fall after a rain, you’ve certainly come across an eft or two (probably way more than that.) They wander onto hiking trails and can be quite numerous the day after a rain. I came across several during a recent walk at Huntington State Park in SW Connecticut. Notice the different colors of the two efts pictured. The eft is the terrestrial stage of the eastern newt. The four stages of the newt are described succinctly in the following post by author David George Haskell.

Photo by Chris Bosak An eft works its way across a path in New England, fall 2021.

And the answer is …

 

Photo by Chris Bosak An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

A newt. More accurately an eft, which is a terrestrial stage of a newt’s life. The efts eventually make their way to water and become newts, which are duller in color and have a tail more suitable for aquatic life.

Birders, hikers and anyone else who uses wooded trails must be careful in the spring and summer, especially after a rain, to be sure not to step on these interesting creatures.

Click here forĀ a Wikipedia page with more information.

Here are few more photos.

Photo by Chris Bosak An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.

Photo by Chris Bosak
An eft crawls across a trail at Merganser Lake in summer, 2016.