About Chris Bosak

Bird columnist and nature photographer based in New England.

Need bird books?

As a new feature to http://www.birdsofnewengland.com, I am offering several birding or nature books for sale. They are gently used books that I have enjoyed and want to pass on to a good, nature-loving home, hence the low prices. Prices include cost of shipping. There is only one copy of each book. Once it is purchased, I will delete the listing. Just in time for winter, Christmas and the next round of quarantine.

Some of the prices may seem high, but I took the lowest Amazon price and shaved off several dollars. I believe some of the books are out of print, which is why they are selling for so much.

Click on “Bird books for sale” in the top menu, or click here: https://birdsofnewengland.com/bird-books-for-sale/

Guess who’s back?

Photo by Chris Bosak Eastern bluebirds perch on a log in New England, November 2020.

I hadn’t seen bluebirds at my feeder since May, but back they came earlier this week. They stayed for about 10 minutes and were gone. I haven’t seen them since. I had a few other surprise visitors to the feeder this week. More on that Continue reading

For the Birds: Migrating white-breasted nuthatches

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Photo by Chris Bosak
A white-breasted nuthatch perches on a branch in New England, fall 2019.

Have you noticed an exceptional number of white-breasted nuthatches at your feeders this fall? If so, you’re not alone and migration is the likely reason.

We don’t typically think of white-breasted nuthatches as migratory birds. They are reliable backyard feeder birds and year-round residents, just like chickadees and tufted titmice. Do they really migrate?

I’ll get to a recent article that describes the white-breasted nuthatch’s irregular migration Continue reading

Fiesty nuthatch with fiery background

Photo by Chris Bosak A white-breasted nuthatch tries to intimidate a few titmice in New England, October 2020.

Here’s a scary, fall-themed bird photo to kick off your Halloween.

This white-breasted nuthatch was not in a sharing mood with the surrounding tufted titmice. Click here for a recent For the Birds column regarding white-breasted nuthatches and migration.

A few different birds showed up

Photo by Chris Bosak A red-breasted nuthatch grabs a seed from a feeding station in New England last week. (October 2020)

Yesterday’s rain did not deter the birds from coming to my homemade feeder, which I worked so hard on. Actually, I found a log in the backyard and placed it on my deck railing. Anyway Continue reading

Feeder birds with New England fall backdrop II

Photo by Chris Bosak A downy woodpecker perches on a log in New England, October 2020.

Here’s part II of my fall feeder birds of New England post. Click here for the original post.

Photo by Chris Bosak A black-capped chickadee perches on a log in New England, October 2020.
Photo by Chris Bosak A white-breasted nuthatch perches on a log in New England, October 2020.

Feeder birds with New England fall backdrop

Photo by Chris Bosak A red-bellied woodpecker perches on a log and grabs a peanut in New England, October 2020.

There’s nothing like a New England fall, especially when it provides a colorful backdrop for bird photos. I found a rotted log in my backyard, positioned it on my deck railing in front of a small sassafras tree, sprinkled some sunflower seeds and peanuts on the log and enjoyed the show. It was nonstop action for hours. I hope to make a video soon as well.

Photo by Chris Bosak A tufted titmouse perches on a log in New England, October 2020.
Photo by Chris Bosak A blue jay perches on a log in New England, October 2020.
Photo by Chris Bosak A blue jay perches on a log and grabs a peanut in New England, October 2020.

For the Birds: Busy, busy feeders

Photo by Chris Bosak American Robin in Selleck's Woods in fall 2013.
Photo by Chris Bosak American Robin in Selleck’s Woods in fall 2013.

Activity at the birdfeeders has been nonstop. I have not seen any of the winter finches or really anything out of the ordinary, but the regulars are showing up in droves. I did see a palm warbler in the birdbath and a few yellow-rumped warblers in the trees.

I’m not alone in being invaded by feeder birds. Bill from Keene wrote recently and made an interesting analogy regarding the many birds at his feeders when he likened the action to an airport terminal. His visitors have included tons of juncos, jays, robins and many more. “Almost clouds, all flying madly, like insects,” Bill wrote. “Looks like an airline terminal.”

I really do like the airport analogy and thought of it the next time I watched my feeders. My frequent fliers are titmice, chickadees, white-breasted nuthatches and downy Continue reading